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... Because it's All in Your Mind!

 

Memory Spring Monthly

Reduce Intake of Refined Sugar to Boost Your Memory!

Sugar - By Gunilla G

Refined sugar! We've all heard that it's bad for us and that we should reduce our intake of it. But, did you know that there’s an increasing amount of data revealing that diets high in refined sugar have an adverse effect on our memory and brain health? It does!

 

In the U.S. we are high consumers of refined sugar. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the average American consumes 156 pounds of refined sugar per year. The Centers for Disease Control puts the amount at 27.5 teaspoons of sugar a day per capita, which translates to 440 calories—nearly one quarter of a typical 2000 calorie a day diet. You might not believe it, but refined sugar is found in almost everything that we consume.

Refined Sugars Versus Natural Sugars 
 

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Work on Your Balance to Improve Your Memory


Balance by Rosmarie Voegtli

Balance is a vital skill and a core component of everyday life. Merriam-Webster defines it as your ability to move or to remain in a position without losing control or falling. Some of us have excellent balance, while some of us struggle with it. But did you know that working on your balance can improve brain function and memory?
 
In fact, those with the best balance are three times less likely to develop dementia, according to a University of Washington study. Another study showed that when balance training was incorporated into the exercise programs of elderly women with complaints of memory problems and confusion, their cognitive function improved significantly.
 

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Want To Improve Your Memory? Work on Your Sense of Smell!

What a Smell by Vikram Sorathia

The holiday season is almost upon us. Soon the air will be filled with all those wonderful smells that bring back so many memories. As a matter of fact, scientists have found that our memories are so connected to smells that odor evoked therapy can be a great tool for helping people improve their memory. 
 
According to Amanda White, psychiatry research technologist at Penn State College of Medicine, our sense of smell is closely linked with memory, probably more so than for any of our other senses.  People with full olfactory function are able to think of smells that evoke particular memories; the scent of an orchard in blossom conjuring up recollections of a childhood picnic, for example.  This often happens spontaneously, with a smell acting as a trigger in recalling a long-forgotten event or experience.  
 

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Socialize More to Improve Your Memory

Socializing 1 by Horst Gutman

Do you socialize enough for your brain? There’s an increasing amount of data that shows that expanding your social calendar helps your memory. As a matter of fact, there’s data that shows that increased socialization can slow the progression of dementia including Alzheimer’s disease.
 
According to the Journal of Aging Research, the number of people with Alzheimer’s disease is expected to triple over the next forty years.  Based upon their research, there are three non-pharmacological strategies to influence brain cognition, general functioning, and overall quality of life. These are: physical exercise, intellectual stimulation, and social interaction.
 

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